Sunday, June 25, 2017

Losing health insurance mean more US deaths and labor force

Having more people loosing their healthcare is a big problem.
It will cause many people to die un-necessary out of not having
a way to fix their problem in a timely manner going into the
emergency room pushing the too late to fit it problem.

Homemade healthcare of superglue, fish antibiotics and peroxide, etc...
But those are the minor fixes there without insurance.

But the point is yes there will be more deaths with no insurance.
But I see it as a massive drop as the mass of people will drop their
insurance for a bigger paycheck being they work hard make the same pay.
The insurance will be dropped for the extra income in the paycheck.
That is like 180+ million working class people with insurance and
likely 60 million are child waged adults. They will drop for food money.

Also being that massive drop will pull down the whole healthcare system
as 60 million less paying consumers hit the insurance comps.
What will stand against that kind of hit?

The labor force, workers without insurance that will get hurt at work
sometime is a liability issue. They would go right to workers comp or
sue the workplace to pay the DR bill! 

They will also be less productive as they don't want to get hurt at work.
Anyway you see it no healthcare is death!

Well really just ask what will the workers do with no insurance.
It doesn't take many poor to kill everything over more food money.
Healthcare is not a issue if you make higher wages.
Seems sad to kill healthcare for people that make low pay?

~~~~~Will losing health insurance mean more US deaths? Experts say yes
More deaths

Various studies have looked at whether uninsured people have a higher risk of death. The most cited was published by the American Journal of Public Health in 2009 and found that nearly 45,000 Americans die each year as a direct result of being uninsured.

Dr Andrew Wilper and a team at Harvard Medical School used two main datasets: they took a nationwide US survey of more than 30,000 people conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and checked it against the National Death Index, another national database collected by the CDC.

The two sets of numbers allowed the researchers to examine something called hazard ratios, which are a way to measure risk. For example, if a clinical trial finds that drug users are three times more likely experience a certain side effect, that drug has a hazard ratio of three.

In America, deep inequality can affect the usefulness of data like this. Lots of things can increase an American’s chances of being sick – being a person of color or being poor to name just two – and if those factors overlap with a lack of health insurance, it can be difficult to determine what exactly is affecting an individual’s risk of death.

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In the Harvard study, the researchers had 9,000 people in their dataset – enough that they were able to ensure they were really measuring the impact of a lack of health insurance.

The researchers found that a lack of health insurance had a mortality hazard ratio of 1.40. In other words, they concluded that Americans without health insurance were 40% more likely to die than those with it, even after taking into account the individual’s “gender, age, race/ethnicity, poverty income ratio, education, unemployment, smoking, regular alcohol use, self-rated health, physician-rated health and body mass index”.

The researchers calculated that in 2005, lack of health insurance resulted in 44,789 deaths of Americans age 18 to 64.
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/jun/24/us-healthcare-republican-bill-no-coverage-death

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