Monday, February 5, 2018

Teacher Accountability in not brought up towns, the poor 10 percent chance

Teacher Accountability relating to high-stakes testing is a issue in smaller
towns that are not brought up yet. Small tows are small for a reason.
As in the term "Raised in a corn field, your mind is only mushed as
the corn field you live in." Noting the lack of stimulus from the lack
of tax dollars from lower pay for schools. Lack of investments from lower
income towns. Stimulus? Like how they always say to keep your mind busy
or you will loose it! So if you go fishing and just go staring at the water waiting
for a fish. Vs duct tape a gas leaf blower to a bicycle to see how fast you can go.
Is this going to work? How fast will we go? It's the matter of personal investment
by doing something vs what resources to do such?

The point is that is how it is in small towns and overall relating to the
lower funding you get less so doing high-stakes testing to kids that
are below level is just setting up teachers and kids for failure
as the kids are more likely coming to the class below level.

Also noted in behavior in how many kids don't grow up until
they are in their 20's not 18. That is how I baseline kids in small towns.
Education is needed, it's like the water that covers the iceberg, the
less you have the more those things pop up and like a crash of the Titanic,
everyone goes down with it! And yes they do! If a kid is having discipline 
issues and is just put back into class without putting the kid where
the issue can be fixed. The kid and others are not learning in class
just spending their time trashing a bathroom getting a mental disorder
from it down the road. Training the brain to be psychotic and that
does not help the learning environment now and in the future!
It's like they got hit in the head with education but they think it's a 
junebug, unrecognized as it flies past their head!
"How do you know, if you don't know?" = Lack of funding to know!!

So because of the lack of support in small towns with bigger towns with 
more resources more income for learning, better foundation. 
More tax dollars to use! Small towns are not big and should be seen
differently than bigger cities!

When I was a kid in the 80's I went to the principle to complain that my
teacher was not teaching me enough. Can you see that done in smaller towns
in the 80's? I had the foundation and awareness I don't want to get stupid
like to just let it go! Like just cut off your legs to save your toe! No thank you!
But in a smaller town that kind of thing won't happen like your not to think for
yourself! It might be drilled in the kids mind but then the kid should know
they are not them stand up and do the best for you! You get what you put into it!

But to hold teachers accountable with a small not brought up town that
gets what it's paid for with low taxes from low pay, low sales.
The town needs to be brought up before any testing.
With the mass of economic inequality full of people that can't even
live with the AC on in the summer can only afford $27 a month bill that's it,
yet alone pay for a $40,000 college loan!
Education cost money so the pay needs to go up. The wages makes the town, 
the town does not make the wages! And with such wage divide the pay 
comes first then the education.

High stakes testing is not a issue with no poverty to lower everything.
More funding is needed to bring smaller towns up and more consideration
of the environment of small towns also helps.

~~~~~Accountability
We believe in accountability. You can’t aspire to excellence without defining it. Schools should be evaluated based on student learning, in unambiguous terms and according to college- and career-readiness standards benchmarked against those of high-performing states and countries. When these ratings show unacceptably low results for years at a time, state and district leaders must apply solutions that are proven to help students learn.
https://www.the74million.org/article/magee-5-key-points-in-chiefs-for-changes-bipartisan-vision-for-americas-schools

http://chiefsforchange.org

No comments: