Sunday, April 2, 2017

Multiple intelligences and Deeper learing

Taking something from my years in school, and about today in everyday life
is something many may know about but then not, so I am doing a story about it.
Multiple intelligences! Still I am useful as a Genie in a bottle!
I remember those test when I was a kid, oh god! But from those test here I am today! 

It's like in the Gnostic, even in it's meaning "having knowledge."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gnosticism

"Yeshua said, A person old in days will not hesitate to ask a little child
seven days old  about the place of life, and the person will live.
For many of the first will be last and become a single one."
http://www.gnosis.org/naghamm/gosthom-meyer.html

And that is a good point to teach more at a early age.
Also I would stop the point of teaching kids to be in the now!
To me I see it as teaching your kids to move only 
one inch at a time making the kids have slow growth.

There is no multiple in moving one inch at a time in the now.
Being in the now disables your thinking and to get more kids to push 
into the multiple intelligence test you need to be in the multiple!

These days I would say it's noted as "Deeper learning."
I never limited my education. In college I took many classes on all ends.
In that I use one part that I had learned on another part I learned.
As in the time I was listening to audiobooks at the same time on two
college courses I was talking that semester. Two headphones, one
on each ear. Two at the same time... Sort of at the same time.
I would pause back and forth. I didn't have time to do both so I did two
at the same time... Half ass is better than no ass at all!
I was working to get like a "C" on both test instead of a "F" on one.
I needed to know both fairly!

Working at Walmart once I did that again. Because of the productivity
harassment (micromanagement) I worked two aisles every 15 minutes,
back and forth to get things done because of all the mess there!

In elementary I hated the math class to the point I threw my math book
out the window. And put it behind the chalkboard once.
But down the road I used math to find the displacement of my cars engine,
finding out the car makers lie about it! 

***Piston Displacement is found by formulating the volume of a cylinder as a
geometric shape which is pi/4 which equals 0.7853982
This number is then multiplied by the square diameter of the bore & multiplied by 
the stroke times the cylinders. Like:
(pi/4)  0.7853982    X   (Bore squared )  3.50 X 4 =14.00   X   (Stroke)  3.78   X  (Cylinders)  4  =166.25 ci  /  2724.34 cc For a 1990 Nissan 240sx!

That was my deeper learning and to point learning is really for later
not now. The stuff learned now is more used for later. But you have to learn it!

~~~~~How Do We Define and Measure “Deeper Learning”?
Simply defined, “deeper learning” is the "process of learning for transfer,"
meaning it allows a student to take what’s learned in one situation and apply it
to another, explained James Pellegrino, one of the authors of the report.
"You can use knowledge in ways that make it useful in new situations,"
he said in a recent webinar. “You have procedural knowledge of how, why,
and when to apply it to answer questions and solve problems.”

To deconstruct the definition of deeper learning further, the researchers came
up with what they call three domains of competence: cognitive, intrapersonal
and interpersonal. Cognitive refers to reasoning and problem solving;
intrapersonal refers to self-management, self-directedness, and conscientiousness;
and interpersonal refers to expressing ideas and communicating and
working with others. "The kinds of tasks we need to assess take kids more time
to enact and more time to score."
https://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2012/09/13/how-do-we-define-and-measure-deeper-learning 

~~~~~Multiple intelligences
Howard Gardner of Harvard has identified seven distinct intelligences. 
This theory has emerged from recent cognitive research and "documents the 
extent to which students possess different kinds of minds and therefore learn, 
remember, perform, and understand in different ways," according to 
Gardner (1991). According to this theory, "we are all able to know the world 
through language, logical-mathematical analysis, spatial representation, musical thinking, 
the use of the body to solve problems or to make things, an understanding of other 
individuals, and an understanding of ourselves. Where individuals differ is in the 
strength of these intelligences - the so-called profile of intelligences -and in the ways 
in which such intelligences are invoked and combined to carry out different tasks, 
solve diverse problems, and progress in various domains."

Gardner says that these differences "challenge an educational system that assumes that 
everyone can learn the same materials in the same way and that a uniform, universal 
measure suffices to test student learning. Indeed, as currently constituted, our educational 
system is heavily biased toward linguistic modes of instruction and assessment and, 
to a somewhat lesser degree, toward logical-quantitative modes as well." 
Gardner argues that "a contrasting set of assumptions is more likely to be educationally 
effective. Students learn in ways that are identifiably distinctive. 
The broad spectrum of students - and perhaps the society as a whole would be better 
served if disciplines could be presented in a numbers of ways and learning could be 
assessed through a variety of means." The learning styles are as follows:

Visual-Spatial - think in terms of physical space, as do architects and sailors. 
Very aware of their environments. They like to draw, do jigsaw puzzles, read maps, 
daydream. They can be taught through drawings, verbal and physical imagery. 
Tools include models, graphics, charts, photographs, drawings, 3-D modeling, 
video, videoconferencing, television, multimedia, texts with pictures/charts/graphs.

Bodily-kinesthetic - use the body effectively, like a dancer or a surgeon. 
Keen sense of body awareness. They like movement, making things, touching. 
They communicate well through body language and be taught through physical activity, 
hands-on learning, acting out, role playing. Tools include equipment and real objects.

Musical - show sensitivity to rhythm and sound. They love music, but they are also 
sensitive to sounds in their environments. They may study better with music in the 
background. They can be taught by turning lessons into lyrics, speaking rhythmically, 
tapping out time. Tools include musical instruments, music, radio, stereo, 
CD-ROM, multimedia.

Interpersonal - understanding, interacting with others. These students learn through 
interaction. They have many friends, empathy for others, street smarts. 
They can be taught through group activities, seminars, dialogues. 
Tools include the telephone, audio conferencing, time and attention from the instructor, 
video conferencing, writing, computer conferencing, E-mail.

Intrapersonal - understanding one's own interests, goals. These learners tend to shy
away from others. They're in tune with their inner feelings; they have wisdom, intuition 
and motivation, as well as a strong will, confidence and opinions. 
They can be taught through independent study and introspection. 
Tools include books, creative materials, diaries, privacy and time. 
They are the most independent of the learners.

Linguistic - using words effectively. These learners have highly developed auditory 
skills and often think in words. They like reading, playing word games, making up 
poetry or stories. They can be taught by encouraging them to say and see words, 
read books together. Tools include computers, games, multimedia, books, 
tape recorders, and lecture.

Logical -Mathematical - reasoning, calculating. Think conceptually, abstractly 
and are able to see and explore patterns and relationships. They like to experiment, 
solve puzzles, ask cosmic questions. They can be taught through logic games, 
investigations, mysteries. They need to learn and form concepts before they can 
deal with details. At first, it may seem impossible to teach to all learning styles. 
However, as we move into using a mix of media or multimedia, it becomes easier. 
As we understand learning styles, it becomes apparent why multimedia appeals to 
learners and why a mix of media is more effective. It satisfies the many types of 
learning preferences that one person may embody or that a class embodies. 
A review of the literature shows that a variety of decisions must be made when 
choosing media that is appropriate to learning style.

Visuals: Visual media help students acquire concrete concepts, such as object 
identification, spatial relationship, or motor skills where words alone are inefficient.

Printed words: There is disagreement about audio's superiority to print for affective 
objectives; several models do not recommend verbal sound if it is not part of the 
task to be learned.

Sound: A distinction is drawn between verbal sound and non-verbal sound such 
as music. Sound media are necessary to present a stimulus for recall or sound 
recognition. Audio narration is recommended for poor readers.

Motion: Models force decisions among still, limited movement, and full 
movement visuals. Motion is used to depict human performance so that learners 
can copy the movement. Several models assert that motion may be unnecessary and 
provides decision aid questions based upon objectives. Visual media which portray 
motion are best to show psychomotor or cognitive domain expectations by 
showing the skill as a model against which students can measure their performance.

Color: Decisions on color display are required if an object's color is relevant to 
what is being learned.

Realia: Realia are tangible, real objects which are not models and are useful to 
teach motor and cognitive skills involving unfamiliar objects. Realia are appropriate 
for use with individuals or groups and may be situation based. Realia may be used 
to present information realistically but it may be equally important that the presentation 
corresponds with the way learner's represent information internally.

Instructional Setting: Design should cover whether the materials are to be used 
in a home or instructional setting and consider the size what is to be learned. 
Print instruction should be delivered in an individualized mode which allows the learner 
to set the learning pace. The ability to provide corrective feedback for individual 
learners is important but any medium can provide corrective feedback by stating 
the correct answer to allow comparison of the two answers.

Learner Characteristics: Most models consider learner characteristics as 
media may be differentially effective for different learners. Although research has 
had limited success in identifying the media most suitable for types of learners several 
models are based on this method.

Reading ability: Pictures facilitate learning for poor readers who benefit more 
from speaking than from writing because they understand spoken words; self-directed 
good readers can control the pace; and print allows easier review.

Categories of Learning Outcomes: Categories ranged from three to eleven and 
most include some or all of Gagne's (1977) learning categories; intellectual skills, 
verbal information, motor skills, attitudes, and cognitive strategies. 
Several models suggest a procedure which categorizes learning outcomes, 
plans instructional events to teach objectives, identifies the type of stimuli to present 
events, and media capable of presenting the stimuli.

Events of Instruction: The external events which support internal learning 
processes are called events of instruction. The events of instruction are planned 
before selecting the media to present it.

Performance: Many models discuss eliciting performance where the student 
practices the task which sets the stage for reinforcement. Several models indicate 
that the elicited performance should be categorized by type; overt, covert, motor, 
verbal, constructed, and select. Media should be selected which is best able to 
elicit these responses and the response frequency. One model advocates a behavioral 
approach so that media is chosen to elicit responses for practice. 
To provide feedback about the student's response, an interactive medium might be 
chosen, but any medium can provide feedback. 
Learner characteristics such as error proneness and anxiety should influence media 
selection. Testing which traditionally is accomplished through print, may be handled 
by electronic media. Media are better able to assess learners' visual skills than 
are print media and can be used to assess learner performance in 
realistic situations.



 

Multiple intelligences slide show

  1. 1. Howard Gardner In 1983 he published a book Frames of Mind outlining seven “intelligences” that all humans have to some degree. His work was based on human psychology, and never intended as an educational system. Yet it has become so widely published, taught and used, it is part of our educational pedagogy today. Multiple Intelligences
  2. 2. Verbal Linguistic Intelligence • Linguistic Students use words effectively. These learners have highly developed auditory skills and often think in words. They like reading, playing word games, making up poetry or stories. They can be taught by encouraging them to say and see words, and read books together. Tools include computers, games, multimedia, books, tape recorders, and lecture. http://iblogideas.blogspot.com/2008_10_01_archive.html Linguistic
  3. 3. Logical & Mathematical Intelligence • Logical –Mathematical Students use reasoning and calculating. They are able to think conceptually and abstractly, and are able to see and explore patterns and relationships. They like to experiment, solve puzzles, ask cosmic questions. They can be taught through logic games, investigations, mysteries. They need to learn and form concepts before they can deal with details. http://www.new-oceans.co.uk/new/education/multi7.htm Logical Mathematical
  4. 4. Musical Intelligence Musical Students show sensitivity to rhythm and sound. They love music, but they are also sensitive to sounds in their environments. They may study better with music in the background. They can be taught by turning lessons into lyrics, speaking rhythmically, tapping out time. Tools include musical instruments, music, radio, stereo, CD-ROM, and multimedia. http://www.indg.gov.in/primary-education/best- practices/multiple-intelligences-theory-which-one-your- learning-style/view?set_language=hi Musical
  5. 5. Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence • Bodily-kinesthetic Students use the body effectively, like a dancer or a surgeon. Keen sense of body awareness. They like movement, making things and touching. They communicate well through body language and are best taught through physical activity, hands-on learning, acting out, role playing. Tools include equipment and real objects. http://expectumf.umf.maine.edu/mihome.html Bodily Kinesthetic
  6. 6. Visual Spatial Intelligence Visual-Spatial Students think in terms of physical space, as do architects And sailors. Very aware oftheir environments. They like to draw, do jigsaw puzzles, read maps, daydream. They can be taught through drawings, verbal and physical imagery. Tools include models, graphics, charts, photographs, drawings, 3-D modeling, video, videoconferencing, television, multimedia, texts with pictures/charts/graphs. http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/history/mi.html Visual Spatial
  7. 7. Interpersonal Intelligence • Interpersonal Students understand and learn by interacting with others. They have many friends, empathy for others and street smarts. They can be taught through group activities, seminars and dialogues. Their tools include the telephone, audio conferencing, time and attention from the instructor, video conferencing, writing, computer conferencing, E- mail. http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/history/mi.html Interpersonal
  8. 8. Intrapersonal Students understand their own interests, goals. These learners tend to shy away from others. They're in tune with their inner feelings; they have wisdom, intuition and motivation, as well as a strong will, confidence and opinions. They can be taught through independent study and introspection. Tools include books, creative materials, diaries, privacy and time. They are the most independent of the learners. http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/biology/b103/f01/web2/wise.html Intrapersonal Intelligence Intrapersonal
  9. 9. http://integral- options.blogspot.com/2007_02_25_archive.html • Naturalist Students feel a deep connection to the Earth, it’s systems, and the natural world. Ability to discriminate among living things and may enjoy botany, agricultural studies, and environmentalist studies. Naturalist Intelligence Naturalist
  10. 10. Existentialist Intelligence • Existentialist Student searches for the larger TRUTH, loves to pose and ponder questions about life, death and ultimate realities. http://pageofstepho.blogspot.com/2007/03/howard-gardner- hee-got-right-idea.html Existentialist

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